Crimean Tatar Resource Center

CTRC experts spoke about the mechanisms for protecting the rights of the child in Crimea

19 November 2021

On Friday, November 19, the Crimean Tatar Resource Center held an online conference dedicated to the anniversary of the signing of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The organization's experts discussed the current situation with the violation of children's rights in the occupied Crimea, and also proposed mechanisms to counter such illegal actions of the Russian Federation.

The speakers were:

Eskender Bariiev - Head of the Board of the Crimean Tatar Resource Center, head of the Department for Legal Affairs and Foreign Affairs of the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People;

Zarema Bariieva - Manager of the Crimean Tatar Resource Center;

Liudmyla Korotkykh - Manager of the Crimean Tatar Resource Center;

Borys Babin - expert of the Crimean Tatar Resource Center, Doctor of Law;

Leviza Dzhelyalova - wife of a political prisoner, First Deputy Chairman of the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar people Nariman Dzhelyalov.

At the beginning of the event, the Crimean Tatar Resource Center presented a trailer for the exclusive documentary Bring Me Back My Dad! The film raises one of the most pressing and painful topics of our time: childhood without a father. The film contains stories of children whose dads were imprisoned or forcibly kidnapped after the occupation of Crimea.

Head of the Board of the Crimean Tatar Resource Center Eskender Bariiev spoke about the importance of such a document as the UN Convention on the Rights of Children.

“On the peninsula, 197 children are forced to grow up without parents. In addition, the rights of thousands of children who become victims of militarization are being violated in Crimea, tens of thousands of children are deprived of the right to receive education in their native language. The articles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child provide for these rights”,- he said.

Leviza Dzhelyalova shared the hardships she and other women of political prisoners face. She talked about the difficult situations that children face without their dads. The woman thanked all those who were not indifferent for their help and support.

Zarema Bariieva spoke about the current situation with the violation of children's rights in the occupied Crimea and how many children are forced to grow up without parental love and care because of the illegal actions of the Russian Federation.

“Until 2014, Crimea was a wonderful place for many people of different ethnicities and religions, but after the Russian occupation of the peninsula in 2014, everything changed. Repressions, persecutions, arrests are the current realities, from which not only adults but also children suffer”,- she stressed.

According to Bariieva, the children of the dead and missing, as well as the children of political prisoners suffered the most. All these children are denied the right to adequate parental care. In addition, the manager of the CTRC gave examples of the militarization of the educational process, incitement of interethnic hatred, as well as the case of the death of a child of a Kremlin prisoner.

The manager of the CTRC Liudmyla Korotkykh noted that the convention provides for mechanisms to protect the rights of the child. First of all, we are talking about the regular reports of the participating countries considered and evaluated by the Committee.

“Ukraine is trying to use this tool to protect children in the occupied territories, but we need to more actively use the opportunities presented by the Convention. Since much attention in the UN system is paid to the situation of children in armed conflicts, which, unfortunately, also takes place in Crimea”,- she explained.

Lawyer Borys Babin stressed that systemic and massive violations of children's rights in Crimea should be the subject of increased attention of international organizations and courts. The total oppression of the interests of children on the peninsula threatens a whole generation of the region's inhabitants and makes it impossible for its sustainable development until the time of de-occupation.